I’d Love to Go Vegan, But I Don’t Have Time To Cook!

IMG_3782

 

So what do Vegans eat for lunch, anyway?

No human who works or has a life really has time to prepare fantastically gourmet meals three times a day. Being a vegan is actually really simple, not scary at all, and doesn’t require ridiculous or foreign-sounding ingredients lists. Don’t get me wrong – there are lots of ways to play with food, and the 10 million vegan bloggers out there all do a fantastic job of demonstrating the culinary prowess and bravado that goes with making really fantastic food.

Of course there are cooks all across the world who upstage little old me in that department.

But this is what happens when an average girl wants to eat a normal lunch and doesn’t have 40 minutes to make it happen. It’s healthy, balanced, vegan, and easy.

IMG_3784

 

I mashed up some tofu in a bowl with a little dried onion soup mix and some breadcrumbs, then fried it up like a burger until it was warm and crispy. About 5 minutes.

Then I topped it with basil, black beans, tomato and avocado. It was basically building a sandwich, minus the bread.

Sliced apples and sunflower butter on the side.

Done!

And no oven required. Bon appetit.

Fast Food, or Real Food Fast

IMG_3715

If there is one thing I would impart to the entire world if I could, it would be that being vegan is easy. Many people understand the environmental and health benefits of being vegan, but don’t think it would fit into their busy lifestyle.

Well, that’s bullshit because it can, and this blog is here to prove it.

For lunch today I opened the refrigerator and did that thing we all do where I stared at the contents and waited for something to jump out and cook itself. Nothing did. I checked the cabinets, the pantry and eventually came back to the fridge to look again because obviously something might have changed while I was gone.

Nope; Not really.

So, I grabbed a few containers of canned goods we hadn’t finished and decided to mush them up together and put the result on bread. Brilliance or luck? I’d like to think both but being honest, probably the latter. I don’t have that many brilliant moments, I just get hungry a lot.

Either way, the outcome was an amazingly accidental sandwich spread/potential dip that took literally 20 seconds to make and used up some leftover ingredients.

IMG_3717

Layered on a baguette from last night (that dad served with some meaty chili I couldn’t eat) with avocado and cucumber slices. I scooped some mellon on the side and this was a beautiful product of happenstance, jerry-rigging, experimentation, or whatever you would like to call random food-processing.

The moral of the story: this took less time than it would to cook a chicken breast, chop a salad, or order takeout. Don’t be afraid to throw something together, and see what you get. You’d be surprised what goodness comes out of taking risks, and being vegan.

Bon appetit.

IMG_3714

Ingredients

1/2 can of artichoke hearts

1/2 can of black beans

1/4 C. roasted red peppers

Olive oil

sandwich spread

Method

Put all ingredients in a food processor and blend, adding oil until mixture reaches desired consistency.

You could blend longer for a creamier spread, or only a few pulses for a chunky dip.

Serving suggestion: On everything; chips, carrots, peppers, bread, crackers, veggie burgers, or mixed with green beans for a cold salad.

The Junk Food Vegan

IMG_3692

Health is hard.

It seems like every day there’s a new study released about the benefits of this berry or that grain, and we’re supposed to incorporate these new “discoveries” into our lifestyle at the drop of hat.

Let’s be honest though, ain’t nobody got time for that. 

IMG_3691

And when you ain’t got no time, you’re probably gonna do what I did: throw something in the oven. Vegans today are not unaware of such glorious inventions as “the microwave” or “the frozen section.” In fact, there are a surprising number of pre-made options available, the most glorious of which being pizza (as a 22 year-old what else can you say about this decision other than, “but of course”).

Enter: Amy’s Roasted Vegetable Phantasmagoria.

IMG_3689

Ok, that’s not really what it’s called but that’s how I feel about it. Just check out that ingredients list! Sexy. You are what you eat right? So, it’s perfectly normal to think of an ingredients list as sexy.

It is.

IMG_3699

So even though pizza is normally considered junk food, this savory little indulgence comes as close to healthy possible, or even desirable. The only thing left is carbs…and if you tried to make this without carbs I’d kill you.

Just consume with a fruit, a vegetable (kale salad, anyone?) and of course your preferred beverage of the moment; which we all know is a healthy pumpkin spice latte, served in a cat in the hat mug because creativity is cool.

IMG_3693

Bon appetit.

Protein from Plants

lentils

I’ve never had as many people worry about my protein as I have once they find out that I’m vegan. Of course no one wonders where gorillas get their protein, or elephants, or any other large mammal on earth that doesn’t consume other animals to survive.

In fact, too much protein is a bad thing as it causes your body to leach alkaline minerals such as calcium and phosphorus from your bones to compensate for the acidic environment it creates. Your body actually makes it’s own protein by recycling the cells that are shed from the intestinal wall and from used up digestive enzymes.

protein?

What we need to do this are amino acids which are what we get from food, not protein itself. Therefore, protein is not necessairly equatable to flesh. Eating a variety of plants ensures that we get the right combination of amino acids.

There isn’t even a medical term for protein deficiency, because it would only result from calorie deficiency. Besides, no one would advocate eating a smaller range of veggies just because you’re eating chicken. Make sense?

Maybe it’s just easier to tell people that I get my protein from plants. Like the ones I ate for lunch. Brown rice & black beans (perfect amino acid combo…I mean protein source) with tomatoes, cucumbers and avocados.

IMG_3678

Plus a side of cabbage cooked in sesame oil, topped with some sesame seeds (a great source of calcium, by the way) and dried cranberries.

IMG_3680

All packed ready to go in my delightfully recycled tupperware.

IMG_3681

Bon appetit.

Photos: http://www.mindbodygreen.com/0-5488/7-Health-Benefits-of-Lentils.html, http://www.strongprotein.com/questions/can-a-vegetarian-use-whey-protein-powder/

Eggplant, Hummus, Roasted Red Pepper and Basil Panini

You should never underestimate the power of the eggplant. Not unlike myself, with a little love and attention this spongy, bitter nightshade transforms into a glorious, succulent, and dare I say, meaty dish. It goes in everything: dips, salads, pasta, casseroles, or my personal favorite, the king of convenience – sandwiches.

Being vegan, vegetarian, or even just hungry isn’t a hardship when you’ve got savory eggplant loaded with hummus, sweet basil, and roasted red peppers. Ready to level-up? Grill it. Press it, smash it, heat it and don’t stop until this baby is a golden, crusty masterpiece that has your tastebuds screaming “get on me.”

This panini is simple, elegant, delicious, and the best part is you don’t even need a fork; just two hands and an appetite for awesome.

Bon appetit.

Eggplant Panini

Ingredients

2 ciabatta rolls

Olive oil

2-3 1/2” eggplant slices

4 fresh basil leaves

2 Tbsp. prepared hummus

1 roasted red pepper, halved

Method

Preheat a large non-stick skillet to medium/medium-high heat.

Brush each side of your eggplant slices with some olive oil using a basting brush or clean hands, and transfer to the hot skillet.

Cook each side of the eggplant about 5 minutes, until they’re golden brown and soft but not mushy.

Meanwhile, slice ciabatta rolls in half and spread 1 Tbsp. of hummus on the top of each.

Next, layer 1 large or 2 small fresh basil leaves, followed by 1/2 of a whole roasted red pepper (mine were from a jar) and cooked eggplant slices.

Top with the other half of the ciabatta roll and either brush each side with more olive oil and return to your hot pan (pressing with another pan weighed with whatever heavy item you have in your kitchen, usually cans) or transfer to panini press.

Cook 3 mins on each side if using the homemade press method, or 4 minutes on a panini press set to medium heat.

Serving suggestion: Hot, with copious amounts of vegetables.

And a side of dog. (Or a dog by your side!)